QList Class Reference

The QList class is a template class that provides lists. More...

 #include <QList>

Inherited by: QItemSelection, QQueue, QSignalSpy, QStringList, and QTestEventList.

Note: All functions in this class are reentrant.

Public Types

class const_iterator
class iterator
typedef ConstIterator
typedef Iterator
typedef const_pointer
typedef const_reference
typedef difference_type
typedef pointer
typedef reference
typedef size_type
typedef value_type

Public Functions

QList ()
QList ( const QList<T> & other )
QList ( std::initializer_list<T> args )
~QList ()
void append ( const T & value )
void append ( const QList<T> & value )
const T & at ( int i ) const
T & back ()
const T & back () const
iterator begin ()
const_iterator begin () const
void clear ()
const_iterator constBegin () const
const_iterator constEnd () const
bool contains ( const T & value ) const
int count ( const T & value ) const
int count () const
bool empty () const
iterator end ()
const_iterator end () const
bool endsWith ( const T & value ) const
iterator erase ( iterator pos )
iterator erase ( iterator begin, iterator end )
T & first ()
const T & first () const
T & front ()
const T & front () const
int indexOf ( const T & value, int from = 0 ) const
void insert ( int i, const T & value )
iterator insert ( iterator before, const T & value )
bool isEmpty () const
T & last ()
const T & last () const
int lastIndexOf ( const T & value, int from = -1 ) const
int length () const
QList<T> mid ( int pos, int length = -1 ) const
void move ( int from, int to )
void pop_back ()
void pop_front ()
void prepend ( const T & value )
void push_back ( const T & value )
void push_front ( const T & value )
int removeAll ( const T & value )
void removeAt ( int i )
void removeFirst ()
void removeLast ()
bool removeOne ( const T & value )
void replace ( int i, const T & value )
void reserve ( int alloc )
int size () const
bool startsWith ( const T & value ) const
void swap ( QList<T> & other )
void swap ( int i, int j )
T takeAt ( int i )
T takeFirst ()
T takeLast ()
QSet<T> toSet () const
std::list<T> toStdList () const
QVector<T> toVector () const
T value ( int i ) const
T value ( int i, const T & defaultValue ) const
bool operator!= ( const QList<T> & other ) const
QList<T> operator+ ( const QList<T> & other ) const
QList<T> & operator+= ( const QList<T> & other )
QList<T> & operator+= ( const T & value )
QList<T> & operator<< ( const QList<T> & other )
QList<T> & operator<< ( const T & value )
QList<T> & operator= ( const QList<T> & other )
bool operator== ( const QList<T> & other ) const
T & operator[] ( int i )
const T & operator[] ( int i ) const

Static Public Members

QList<T> fromSet ( const QSet<T> & set )
QList<T> fromStdList ( const std::list<T> & list )
QList<T> fromVector ( const QVector<T> & vector )

Related Non-Members

QDataStream & operator<< ( QDataStream & out, const QList<T> & list )
QDataStream & operator>> ( QDataStream & in, QList<T> & list )

Detailed Description

The QList class is a template class that provides lists.

QList<T> is one of Qt's generic container classes. It stores a list of values and provides fast index-based access as well as fast insertions and removals.

QList<T>, QLinkedList<T>, and QVector<T> provide similar functionality. Here's an overview:

  • For most purposes, QList is the right class to use. Its index-based API is more convenient than QLinkedList's iterator-based API, and it is usually faster than QVector because of the way it stores its items in memory. It also expands to less code in your executable.
  • If you need a real linked list, with guarantees of constant time insertions in the middle of the list and iterators to items rather than indexes, use QLinkedList.
  • If you want the items to occupy adjacent memory positions, use QVector.

Internally, QList<T> is represented as an array of pointers to items of type T. If T is itself a pointer type or a basic type that is no larger than a pointer, or if T is one of Qt's shared classes, then QList<T> stores the items directly in the pointer array. For lists under a thousand items, this array representation allows for very fast insertions in the middle, and it allows index-based access. Furthermore, operations like prepend() and append() are very fast, because QList preallocates memory at both ends of its internal array. (See Algorithmic Complexity for details.) Note, however, that for unshared list items that are larger than a pointer, each append or insert of a new item requires allocating the new item on the heap, and this per item allocation might make QVector a better choice in cases that do lots of appending or inserting, since QVector allocates memory for its items in a single heap allocation.

Note that the internal array only ever gets bigger over the life of the list. It never shrinks. The internal array is deallocated by the destructor, by clear(), and by the assignment operator, when one list is assigned to another.

Here's an example of a QList that stores integers and a QList that stores QDate values:

 QList<int> integerList;
 QList<QDate> dateList;

Qt includes a QStringList class that inherits QList<QString> and adds a convenience function QStringList::join(). (QString::split() creates QStringLists from strings.)

QList stores a list of items. The default constructor creates an empty list. To insert items into the list, you can use operator<<():

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "one" << "two" << "three";
 // list: ["one", "two", "three"]

QList provides these basic functions to add, move, and remove items: insert(), replace(), removeAt(), move(), and swap(). In addition, it provides the following convenience functions: append(), prepend(), removeFirst(), and removeLast().

QList uses 0-based indexes, just like C++ arrays. To access the item at a particular index position, you can use operator[](). On non-const lists, operator[]() returns a reference to the item and can be used on the left side of an assignment:

 if (list[0] == "Bob")
     list[0] = "Robert";

Because QList is implemented as an array of pointers, this operation is very fast (constant time). For read-only access, an alternative syntax is to use at():

 for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); ++i) {
     if (list.at(i) == "Jane")
         cout << "Found Jane at position " << i << endl;
 }

at() can be faster than operator[](), because it never causes a deep copy to occur.

A common requirement is to remove an item from a list and do something with it. For this, QList provides takeAt(), takeFirst(), and takeLast(). Here's a loop that removes the items from a list one at a time and calls delete on them:

 QList<QWidget *> list;
 ...
 while (!list.isEmpty())
     delete list.takeFirst();

Inserting and removing items at either ends of the list is very fast (constant time in most cases), because QList preallocates extra space on both sides of its internal buffer to allow for fast growth at both ends of the list.

If you want to find all occurrences of a particular value in a list, use indexOf() or lastIndexOf(). The former searches forward starting from a given index position, the latter searches backward. Both return the index of a matching item if they find it; otherwise, they return -1. For example:

 int i = list.indexOf("Jane");
 if (i != -1)
     cout << "First occurrence of Jane is at position " << i << endl;

If you simply want to check whether a list contains a particular value, use contains(). If you want to find out how many times a particular value occurs in the list, use count(). If you want to replace all occurrences of a particular value with another, use replace().

QList's value type must be an assignable data type. This covers most data types that are commonly used, but the compiler won't let you, for example, store a QWidget as a value; instead, store a QWidget *. A few functions have additional requirements; for example, indexOf() and lastIndexOf() expect the value type to support operator==(). These requirements are documented on a per-function basis.

Like the other container classes, QList provides Java-style iterators (QListIterator and QMutableListIterator) and STL-style iterators (QList::const_iterator and QList::iterator). In practice, these are rarely used, because you can use indexes into the QList. QList is implemented in such a way that direct index-based access is just as fast as using iterators.

QList does not support inserting, prepending, appending or replacing with references to its own values. Doing so will cause your application to abort with an error message.

To make QList as efficient as possible, its member functions don't validate their input before using it. Except for isEmpty(), member functions always assume the list is not empty. Member functions that take index values as parameters always assume their index value parameters are in the valid range. This means QList member functions can fail. If you define QT_NO_DEBUG when you compile, failures will not be detected. If you don't define QT_NO_DEBUG, failures will be detected using Q_ASSERT() or Q_ASSERT_X() with an appropriate message.

To avoid failures when your list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling other member functions. If you must pass an index value that might not be in the valid range, check that it is less than the value returned by size() but not less than 0.

See also QListIterator, QMutableListIterator, QLinkedList, and QVector.

Member Type Documentation

typedef QList::ConstIterator

Qt-style synonym for QList::const_iterator.

typedef QList::Iterator

Qt-style synonym for QList::iterator.

typedef QList::const_pointer

Typedef for const T *. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::const_reference

Typedef for const T &. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::difference_type

Typedef for ptrdiff_t. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::pointer

Typedef for T *. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::reference

Typedef for T &. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::size_type

Typedef for int. Provided for STL compatibility.

typedef QList::value_type

Typedef for T. Provided for STL compatibility.

Member Function Documentation

QList::QList ()

Constructs an empty list.

QList::QList ( const QList<T> & other )

Constructs a copy of other.

This operation takes constant time, because QList is implicitly shared. This makes returning a QList from a function very fast. If a shared instance is modified, it will be copied (copy-on-write), and that takes linear time.

See also operator=().

QList::QList ( std::initializer_list<T> args )

Construct a list from the std::initializer_list specified by args.

This constructor is only enabled if the compiler supports C++0x

This function was introduced in Qt 4.8.

QList::~QList ()

Destroys the list. References to the values in the list and all iterators of this list become invalid.

void QList::append ( const T & value )

Inserts value at the end of the list.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list.append("one");
 list.append("two");
 list.append("three");
 // list: ["one", "two", "three"]

This is the same as list.insert(size(), value).

This operation is typically very fast (constant time), because QList preallocates extra space on both sides of its internal buffer to allow for fast growth at both ends of the list.

See also operator<<(), prepend(), and insert().

void QList::append ( const QList<T> & value )

This is an overloaded function.

Appends the items of the value list to this list.

This function was introduced in Qt 4.5.

See also operator<<() and operator+=().

const T & QList::at ( int i ) const

Returns the item at index position i in the list. i must be a valid index position in the list (i.e., 0 <= i < size()).

This function is very fast (constant time).

See also value() and operator[]().

T & QList::back ()

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to last(). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

const T & QList::back () const

This is an overloaded function.

iterator QList::begin ()

Returns an STL-style iterator pointing to the first item in the list.

See also constBegin() and end().

const_iterator QList::begin () const

This is an overloaded function.

void QList::clear ()

Removes all items from the list.

See also removeAll().

const_iterator QList::constBegin () const

Returns a const STL-style iterator pointing to the first item in the list.

See also begin() and constEnd().

const_iterator QList::constEnd () const

Returns a const STL-style iterator pointing to the imaginary item after the last item in the list.

See also constBegin() and end().

bool QList::contains ( const T & value ) const

Returns true if the list contains an occurrence of value; otherwise returns false.

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

See also indexOf() and count().

int QList::count ( const T & value ) const

Returns the number of occurrences of value in the list.

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

See also contains() and indexOf().

int QList::count () const

Returns the number of items in the list. This is effectively the same as size().

bool QList::empty () const

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to isEmpty() and returns true if the list is empty.

iterator QList::end ()

Returns an STL-style iterator pointing to the imaginary item after the last item in the list.

See also begin() and constEnd().

const_iterator QList::end () const

This is an overloaded function.

bool QList::endsWith ( const T & value ) const

Returns true if this list is not empty and its last item is equal to value; otherwise returns false.

This function was introduced in Qt 4.5.

See also isEmpty() and contains().

iterator QList::erase ( iterator pos )

Removes the item associated with the iterator pos from the list, and returns an iterator to the next item in the list (which may be end()).

See also insert() and removeAt().

iterator QList::erase ( iterator begin, iterator end )

This is an overloaded function.

Removes all the items from begin up to (but not including) end. Returns an iterator to the same item that end referred to before the call.

T & QList::first ()

Returns a reference to the first item in the list. The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

See also last() and isEmpty().

const T & QList::first () const

This is an overloaded function.

QList<T> QList::fromSet ( const QSet<T> & set ) [static]

Returns a QList object with the data contained in set. The order of the elements in the QList is undefined.

Example:

 QSet<int> set;
 set << 20 << 30 << 40 << ... << 70;

 QList<int> list = QList<int>::fromSet(set);
 qSort(list);

See also fromVector(), toSet(), QSet::toList(), and qSort().

QList<T> QList::fromStdList ( const std::list<T> & list ) [static]

Returns a QList object with the data contained in list. The order of the elements in the QList is the same as in list.

Example:

 std::list<double> stdlist;
 list.push_back(1.2);
 list.push_back(0.5);
 list.push_back(3.14);

 QList<double> list = QList<double>::fromStdList(stdlist);

See also toStdList() and QVector::fromStdVector().

QList<T> QList::fromVector ( const QVector<T> & vector ) [static]

Returns a QList object with the data contained in vector.

Example:

 QVector<double> vect;
 vect << 20.0 << 30.0 << 40.0 << 50.0;

 QList<double> list = QVector<T>::fromVector(vect);
 // list: [20.0, 30.0, 40.0, 50.0]

See also fromSet(), toVector(), and QVector::toList().

T & QList::front ()

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to first(). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

const T & QList::front () const

This is an overloaded function.

int QList::indexOf ( const T & value, int from = 0 ) const

Returns the index position of the first occurrence of value in the list, searching forward from index position from. Returns -1 if no item matched.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "A" << "B" << "C" << "B" << "A";
 list.indexOf("B");          // returns 1
 list.indexOf("B", 1);       // returns 1
 list.indexOf("B", 2);       // returns 3
 list.indexOf("X");          // returns -1

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

Note that QList uses 0-based indexes, just like C++ arrays. Negative indexes are not supported with the exception of the value mentioned above.

See also lastIndexOf() and contains().

void QList::insert ( int i, const T & value )

Inserts value at index position i in the list. If i is 0, the value is prepended to the list. If i is size(), the value is appended to the list.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "alpha" << "beta" << "delta";
 list.insert(2, "gamma");
 // list: ["alpha", "beta", "gamma", "delta"]

See also append(), prepend(), replace(), and removeAt().

iterator QList::insert ( iterator before, const T & value )

This is an overloaded function.

Inserts value in front of the item pointed to by the iterator before. Returns an iterator pointing at the inserted item. Note that the iterator passed to the function will be invalid after the call; the returned iterator should be used instead.

bool QList::isEmpty () const

Returns true if the list contains no items; otherwise returns false.

See also size().

T & QList::last ()

Returns a reference to the last item in the list. The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

See also first() and isEmpty().

const T & QList::last () const

This is an overloaded function.

int QList::lastIndexOf ( const T & value, int from = -1 ) const

Returns the index position of the last occurrence of value in the list, searching backward from index position from. If from is -1 (the default), the search starts at the last item. Returns -1 if no item matched.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "A" << "B" << "C" << "B" << "A";
 list.lastIndexOf("B");      // returns 3
 list.lastIndexOf("B", 3);   // returns 3
 list.lastIndexOf("B", 2);   // returns 1
 list.lastIndexOf("X");      // returns -1

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

Note that QList uses 0-based indexes, just like C++ arrays. Negative indexes are not supported with the exception of the value mentioned above.

See also indexOf().

int QList::length () const

This function is identical to count().

This function was introduced in Qt 4.5.

See also count().

QList<T> QList::mid ( int pos, int length = -1 ) const

Returns a list whose elements are copied from this list, starting at position pos. If length is -1 (the default), all elements from pos are copied; otherwise length elements (or all remaining elements if there are less than length elements) are copied.

void QList::move ( int from, int to )

Moves the item at index position from to index position to.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "A" << "B" << "C" << "D" << "E" << "F";
 list.move(1, 4);
 // list: ["A", "C", "D", "E", "B", "F"]

This is the same as insert(to, takeAt(from)).This function assumes that both from and to are at least 0 but less than size(). To avoid failure, test that both from and to are at least 0 and less than size().

See also swap(), insert(), and takeAt().

void QList::pop_back ()

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to removeLast(). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

void QList::pop_front ()

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to removeFirst(). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

void QList::prepend ( const T & value )

Inserts value at the beginning of the list.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list.prepend("one");
 list.prepend("two");
 list.prepend("three");
 // list: ["three", "two", "one"]

This is the same as list.insert(0, value).

This operation is usually very fast (constant time), because QList preallocates extra space on both sides of its internal buffer to allow for fast growth at both ends of the list.

See also append() and insert().

void QList::push_back ( const T & value )

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to append(value).

void QList::push_front ( const T & value )

This function is provided for STL compatibility. It is equivalent to prepend(value).

int QList::removeAll ( const T & value )

Removes all occurrences of value in the list and returns the number of entries removed.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "sun" << "cloud" << "sun" << "rain";
 list.removeAll("sun");
 // list: ["cloud", "rain"]

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

See also removeOne(), removeAt(), takeAt(), and replace().

void QList::removeAt ( int i )

Removes the item at index position i. i must be a valid index position in the list (i.e., 0 <= i < size()).

See also takeAt(), removeFirst(), removeLast(), and removeOne().

void QList::removeFirst ()

Removes the first item in the list. Calling this function is equivalent to calling removeAt(0). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

See also removeAt() and takeFirst().

void QList::removeLast ()

Removes the last item in the list. Calling this function is equivalent to calling removeAt(size() - 1). The list must not be empty. If the list can be empty, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

See also removeAt() and takeLast().

bool QList::removeOne ( const T & value )

Removes the first occurrence of value in the list and returns true on success; otherwise returns false.

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "sun" << "cloud" << "sun" << "rain";
 list.removeOne("sun");
 // list: ["cloud", ,"sun", "rain"]

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

This function was introduced in Qt 4.4.

See also removeAll(), removeAt(), takeAt(), and replace().

void QList::replace ( int i, const T & value )

Replaces the item at index position i with value. i must be a valid index position in the list (i.e., 0 <= i < size()).

See also operator[]() and removeAt().

void QList::reserve ( int alloc )

Reserve space for alloc elements.

If alloc is smaller than the current size of the list, nothing will happen.

Use this function to avoid repetetive reallocation of QList's internal data if you can predict how many elements will be appended. Note that the reservation applies only to the internal pointer array.

This function was introduced in Qt 4.7.

int QList::size () const

Returns the number of items in the list.

See also isEmpty() and count().

bool QList::startsWith ( const T & value ) const

Returns true if this list is not empty and its first item is equal to value; otherwise returns false.

This function was introduced in Qt 4.5.

See also isEmpty() and contains().

void QList::swap ( QList<T> & other )

Swaps list other with this list. This operation is very fast and never fails.

This function was introduced in Qt 4.8.

void QList::swap ( int i, int j )

Exchange the item at index position i with the item at index position j. This function assumes that both i and j are at least 0 but less than size(). To avoid failure, test that both i and j are at least 0 and less than size().

Example:

 QList<QString> list;
 list << "A" << "B" << "C" << "D" << "E" << "F";
 list.swap(1, 4);
 // list: ["A", "E", "C", "D", "B", "F"]

See also move().

T QList::takeAt ( int i )

Removes the item at index position i and returns it. i must be a valid index position in the list (i.e., 0 <= i < size()).

If you don't use the return value, removeAt() is more efficient.

See also removeAt(), takeFirst(), and takeLast().

T QList::takeFirst ()

Removes the first item in the list and returns it. This is the same as takeAt(0). This function assumes the list is not empty. To avoid failure, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

This operation takes constant time.

If you don't use the return value, removeFirst() is more efficient.

See also takeLast(), takeAt(), and removeFirst().

T QList::takeLast ()

Removes the last item in the list and returns it. This is the same as takeAt(size() - 1). This function assumes the list is not empty. To avoid failure, call isEmpty() before calling this function.

This operation takes constant time.

If you don't use the return value, removeLast() is more efficient.

See also takeFirst(), takeAt(), and removeLast().

QSet<T> QList::toSet () const

Returns a QSet object with the data contained in this QList. Since QSet doesn't allow duplicates, the resulting QSet might be smaller than the original list was.

Example:

 QStringList list;
 list << "Julia" << "Mike" << "Mike" << "Julia" << "Julia";

 QSet<QString> set = list.toSet();
 set.contains("Julia");  // returns true
 set.contains("Mike");   // returns true
 set.size();             // returns 2

See also toVector(), fromSet(), and QSet::fromList().

std::list<T> QList::toStdList () const

Returns a std::list object with the data contained in this QList. Example:

 QList<double> list;
 list << 1.2 << 0.5 << 3.14;

 std::list<double> stdlist = list.toStdList();

See also fromStdList() and QVector::toStdVector().

QVector<T> QList::toVector () const

Returns a QVector object with the data contained in this QList.

Example:

 QStringList list;
 list << "Sven" << "Kim" << "Ola";

 QVector<QString> vect = list.toVector();
 // vect: ["Sven", "Kim", "Ola"]

See also toSet(), fromVector(), and QVector::fromList().

T QList::value ( int i ) const

Returns the value at index position i in the list.

If the index i is out of bounds, the function returns a default-constructed value. If you are certain that the index is going to be within bounds, you can use at() instead, which is slightly faster.

See also at() and operator[]().

T QList::value ( int i, const T & defaultValue ) const

This is an overloaded function.

If the index i is out of bounds, the function returns defaultValue.

bool QList::operator!= ( const QList<T> & other ) const

Returns true if other is not equal to this list; otherwise returns false.

Two lists are considered equal if they contain the same values in the same order.

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

See also operator==().

QList<T> QList::operator+ ( const QList<T> & other ) const

Returns a list that contains all the items in this list followed by all the items in the other list.

See also operator+=().

QList<T> & QList::operator+= ( const QList<T> & other )

Appends the items of the other list to this list and returns a reference to this list.

See also operator+() and append().

QList<T> & QList::operator+= ( const T & value )

This is an overloaded function.

Appends value to the list.

See also append() and operator<<().

QList<T> & QList::operator<< ( const QList<T> & other )

Appends the items of the other list to this list and returns a reference to this list.

See also operator+=() and append().

QList<T> & QList::operator<< ( const T & value )

This is an overloaded function.

Appends value to the list.

QList<T> & QList::operator= ( const QList<T> & other )

Assigns other to this list and returns a reference to this list.

bool QList::operator== ( const QList<T> & other ) const

Returns true if other is equal to this list; otherwise returns false.

Two lists are considered equal if they contain the same values in the same order.

This function requires the value type to have an implementation of operator==().

See also operator!=().

T & QList::operator[] ( int i )

Returns the item at index position i as a modifiable reference. i must be a valid index position in the list (i.e., 0 <= i < size()).

This function is very fast (constant time).

See also at() and value().

const T & QList::operator[] ( int i ) const

This is an overloaded function.

Same as at().

Related Non-Members

QDataStream & operator<< ( QDataStream & out, const QList<T> & list )

Writes the list list to stream out.

This function requires the value type to implement operator<<().

See also Format of the QDataStream operators.

QDataStream & operator>> ( QDataStream & in, QList<T> & list )

Reads a list from stream in into list.

This function requires the value type to implement operator>>().

See also Format of the QDataStream operators.

Notes provided by the Qt Community
Informative
  • 5

Votes: 5

Coverage: Qt library 4.8, 4.7, 5.0

Picture of Volker Volker

Ant Farmer
35 notes

Nokia Certified Qt Developer

Regarding QList::insert ( int i, const T & value )

The documentation states:

Inserts value at index position i in the list. If i is 0, the value is prepended to the list. If i is size(), the value is appended to the list.

Actually, the behavior is a bit more relaxed:

  • if i is negative or zero, the value is prepended to the list
  • if i is equal to size() or bigger, the value is appended to the list

[Revisions]

Informative
  • 5

Votes: 1

Coverage: Qt library 4.7, 4.8, 5.0

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Robot Herder
5 notes

Inheriting from QList

When writing a class that inherits from QList, be aware that QList’s destructor is non-virtual. Therefore, the destructor of your derived class may not be called when a pointer to the base class QList is used.

If you need to add actual code to your derived class destructor, you must somehow make sure no-one ever uses a base class pointer referring to your derived class.

My personal view is that this would create a potential source of trouble, and should be avoided altogether.

[Revisions]

Informative
  • 0

Votes: 0

Coverage: Qt 4.8

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Lab Rat
3 notes

To fix in fromStdList() method!

The example is wrong in the name of the list where the items are set. It is necessary to change the push_back() calls:

  1. stdlist.push_back(1.2);
  2. stdlist.push_back(0.5);
  3. stdlist.push_back(3.14);

[Revisions]

Informative
  • 0

Votes: 0

Coverage: Qt 4.8

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Ant Farmer
2 notes

Amplification of indexOf description

The documentation above contains, at the time of writing, “If you want to find all occurrences of a particular value in a list, use indexOf() or lastIndexOf(). “

Presumably that should read “If you want to find the first or last occurrence of a particular value in a list, use indexOf() or lastIndexOf(). “ Those functions do not find all occurrences.

You can find all occurrences by repeated calls and using the output from the last call as the optional from parameter.

[Revisions]